Tivo Alert: Inside Cocaine Submarines

h/t The Coast Guard Compass

Inside Cocaine Submarines airs Sunday 10 pm on the National Geographic Channel:

Colombian drug traffickers are using a new secret weapon to smuggle cocaine north: drug submarines. Up to 100 feet long and nearly impossible to detect , they are capable of distributing several tons of coke in just one shipment. Dozens of subs are thought to be in operation between the coasts of Colombia and Mexico, and law enforcement estimates that another 70 will be built in the next year alone.

For additional photos, video, and more click here.

13 thoughts on “Tivo Alert: Inside Cocaine Submarines

  1. Nice try by the National Geographic – they aren’t submarines, they aren’t new, and they aren’t secret.

    You’d think they would try to be more accurate.

      • Well, well, well – we must have the old “Surface Force” here in a new disguise. Welcome back, shipmate! šŸ˜‰

        First of all, they aren’t true submarines. They aren’t really “semi-submersibles” – from a naval engineering standpoint they are more accurately called “low profile vessels,” because the only manner in which they can alter their displacement is by adding and removing solid ballast. We call them SPSS because that’s what the recent legislation (DVTIA) calls them. Now it is true that the Colombians have found a true “submarine” under construction, we’ve never encountered one in the water.

        They aren’t new – they have been around for at least four years that we know of, probably longer. They aren’t secret, either – given that the NG is doing a report on them, that you would consider them to be secret shows how clueless YOU are!

        Oh, and as far as the “clueless” comment – I’ve actually been on board a captured SPSS – have you?

        Nice to see you back, however. Did you get canned as “Surface Force?” LOL….

  2. Nice try by the National Geographic – they aren't submarines, they aren't new, and they aren't secret. You'd think they would try to be more accurate.

  3. Well, well, well – we must have the old “Surface Force” here in a new disguise. Welcome back, shipmate! ;-)First of all, they aren't true submarines. They aren't really “semi-submersibles” – from a naval engineering standpoint they are more accurately called “low profile vessels,” because the only manner in which they can alter their displacement is by adding and removing solid ballast. We call them SPSS because that's what the recent legislation (DVTIA) calls them. Now it is true that the Colombians have found a true “submarine” under construction, we've never encountered one in the water. They aren't new – they have been around for at least four years that we know of, probably longer. They aren't secret, either – given that the NG is doing a report on them, that you would consider them to be secret shows how clueless YOU are!Oh, and as far as the “clueless” comment – I've actually been on board a captured SPSS – have you?Nice to see you back, however. Did you get canned as “Surface Force?” LOL….

  4. Well, well, well – we must have the old “Surface Force” here in a new disguise. Welcome back, shipmate! ;-)First of all, they aren't true submarines. They aren't really “semi-submersibles” – from a naval engineering standpoint they are more accurately called “low profile vessels,” because the only manner in which they can alter their displacement is by adding and removing solid ballast. We call them SPSS because that's what the recent legislation (DVTIA) calls them. Now it is true that the Colombians have found a true “submarine” under construction, we've never encountered one in the water. They aren't new – they have been around for at least four years that we know of, probably longer. They aren't secret, either – given that the NG is doing a report on them, that you would consider them to be secret shows how clueless YOU are!Oh, and as far as the “clueless” comment – I've actually been on board a captured SPSS – have you?Nice to see you back, however. Did you get canned as “Surface Force?” LOL….

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