US/Finish/German Naval Construction Research on Aluminum Ships

Here is a tidbit about a navy program looking at ships of Coast Guard size. It appears they are looking to tap into Finish/German expertise on Aluminum hulled ships, and find out a bit more about how they age and how damage resistant they are. As part of the research they are going to do a SINKEX on two Finish Fast Attack Craft (FAC).

8 thoughts on “US/Finish/German Naval Construction Research on Aluminum Ships

  1. The Asheville class gunboat I was on back in the ’70s was transferred to the Environmental Protection Agency where it continued to serve until recently. It was over 40 years old when scrapped, and the hull was still sound. Those ships took quite a few hits from small arms and RPGs in Vietnam, but nothing over about 20mm that I know of.

  2. I don’t have any experience with aluminum ships, but the largely aluminum general aviation fleet seems to wear a lot better than the largely steel automobiles we are familiar with. Still good to do some serious research. This is becoming important to the Navy as they buy substantial numbers of “Joint High Speed Vessels” JHSV and contemplate arming some of the later versions as combatants. There is also the near term possibility that they may select an all aluminum Littoral Combat Ship (LCS).

  3. The Asheville class gunboat I was on back in the '70s was transferred to the Environmental Protection Agency where it continued to serve until recently. It was over 40 years old when scrapped, and the hull was still sound. Those ships took quite a few hits from small arms and RPGs in Vietnam, but nothing over about 20mm that I know of.

  4. I don't have any experience with aluminum ships, but the largely aluminum general aviation fleet seems to wear a lot better than the largely steel automobiles we are familiar with. Still good to do some serious research. This is becoming important to the Navy as they buy substantial numbers of “Joint High Speed Vessels” JHSV and contemplate arming some of the later versions as combatants. There is also the near term possibility that they may select an all aluminum Littoral Combat Ship (LCS).

  5. Pingback: Maritime Monday 209

  6. WP, I worked on the EPA Ocean Survey Ship Anderson project while at MSC. She was getting far to expensive to keep in operation especially the shafting. The put her out of sevice about 5 years ago and replaced her with ex-USNS Bold a T-AGOS.
    http://www.epa.gov/bold/index.html

    Anderson sure did roll alot!~~

    When they blasted her AL hull at Atlantic Marine, there were many holes plugged only by accumulated layers of paint.

    One can only hope that the new AL ships will hold up well AND be survivable in combat as the PGs were in ‘Nam? Why don’t you go over to Warboats.org and post some on their forum?

  7. WP, I worked on the EPA Ocean Survey Ship Anderson project while at MSC. She was getting far to expensive to keep in operation especially the shafting. The put her out of sevice about 5 years ago and replaced her with ex-USNS Bold a T-AGOS. http://www.epa.gov/bold/index.htmlAnderson sure did roll alot!~~When they blasted her AL hull at Atlantic Marine, there were many holes plugged only by accumulated layers of paint.One can only hope that the new AL ships will hold up well AND be survivable in combat as the PGs were in 'Nam? Why don't you go over to Warboats.org and post some on their forum?

  8. WP, I worked on the EPA Ocean Survey Ship Anderson project while at MSC. She was getting far to expensive to keep in operation especially the shafting. The put her out of sevice about 5 years ago and replaced her with ex-USNS Bold a T-AGOS. http://www.epa.gov/bold/index.htmlAnderson sure did roll alot!~~When they blasted her AL hull at Atlantic Marine, there were many holes plugged only by accumulated layers of paint.One can only hope that the new AL ships will hold up well AND be survivable in combat as the PGs were in 'Nam? Why don't you go over to Warboats.org and post some on their forum?

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s