Acquisition Update: Coast Guard Releases RFI For Polar Icebreaker Acquisition Program Schedule And Industry Studies

The following is a news release:

The Coast Guard released a request for information (RFI) for the polar icebreaker acquisition program today. The request seeks feedback on the program’s notional acquisition approach and schedule, and includes a draft statement of work for industry studies on heavy polar icebreaker technology risks, sustainability, producibility and affordability. The RFI can be found here.

The Coast Guard requests that respondents submit a plan of action and milestones for meeting the acquisition program schedule and identify risks and potential opportunities to accelerate the heavy polar icebreaker acquisition.

The RFI also includes a draft statement of work for future industry studies that will inform efforts to promote affordability and minimize risk.

The deadline to submit responses is Nov. 10, 2016, at 11:00 a.m. Eastern time.

Following the completion of the industry studies, the Coast Guard plans to release a request for proposals for detail design and construction of a heavy polar icebreaker in fiscal year 2018. The service plans to begin production activities in 2020.

For more information: Polar Icebreaker program page

 

2 thoughts on “Acquisition Update: Coast Guard Releases RFI For Polar Icebreaker Acquisition Program Schedule And Industry Studies

    • Although I do see the point of commissioning one icebreaker every five years as described in that article, I think that’s a very expensive way of building up a fleet as every vessel would basically be one-off design due to changing equipment, rules and regulations, mission creep etc. You also wouldn’t have the cost benefit of purchasing long lead time equipment for more than one ship at a time. The ships would also likely end up being built at different yards and even if the same yard got consecutive orders, some of the acquired skills from the first vessel would be lost before the next one could be built.

      How about building a pair of vessels every ten years or so? That’s how e.g. Finland did it in 1975-76, 1986-87 and 1993-94. Russia also has very few one-off icebreakers.

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