Propulsion Concept for River Craft

When, perhaps I should say if, the Coast Guard starts to replace their river tenders (previous plans to develop a common hull with the Army Corp of Engineers seem to have been shelved) perhaps they should look at this propulsion concept involving four Schottel Twin Propellers STP 200 as reported by MarineLog.

6 thoughts on “Propulsion Concept for River Craft

      • That certainly would make sense, but the Army Corps of Engineers corporate culture is not especially conducive to the maritime missions. Yes, they do have a maritime mission that they accomplish, but it is near the bottom of there priority list. I spent 10 years working for the USACE (in a CG funded position) at a VTS. It can be very difficult to explain to an Army 0-6 fresh from a combat engineer mission overseas why they needed to take a vested interest (and devote funding!) to the marine domain.
        The running joke was that if you do a CG mission for the Army, you end up disliked by both services!
        Good idea, but it would be a steep learning curve for USACE to assume that mission and absorb the black hulled culture and ethos.

      • Brian – Thanks for that insight. I’ve always been confused why combat engineers and the civil-oriented parts of USACE are considered interchangeable. Building, maintaining, and operating a lock and dam or levee system or VTS system is so disconnected from demolition, defensive works, and combat mobility, it would be easy to justify separating the civil engineering part of USACE from the Army and make it an agency under the Transportation Dept.

    • the Corps of Engineers are getting cut as much as the Coast Guard. They can’t even keep the Intercoastal Water Way open, so it is not like they are going to be ready to do the job any better.

  1. Thanks Chuck. The black-hull fleet deserves some articles too.

    This drive looks very good for the job, but I wonder about the cost vs. traditional? When it comes to river tenders, it seems cheaper is always better…

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