National Fleet Plan

A friend of the blog, Leesea, recently pointed me to the recent update of the “National Fleet Plan,” which, despite its name, does not really talk about the entire US Fleet. It is really about the Coast Guard, and how it and the Navy will cooperate to “identify additional opportunities for increased commonality and interoperability.”

You can find it in the form of a pdf here.

I have reproduced the table of contents below. Mostly, it is what you would expect and/or hope would be included. There are potential areas of cooperation, current situation, where they hope to progress, and identification of responsible offices.

It really did not get interesting to me until it started talking about the Offshore Patrol Cutter (page 22-24 particularly).

There was one particular section that I thought might be of interest, the “Strategic Laydown” (page 54), which concerns sharing facilities, including ship homeports, with the Navy.

Plan of Action and Milestones
– Fiscal Year 2015: Process Organizational Change Request (OCR) for Coast Guard System Acquisition Integration Laboratory (CGSAIL) relocation to Navy Combat Systems Engineering Development Site (CSEDS).

– Fiscal Year 2015: Submit revised Strategic Laydown (SLD) request and OCR to homeport 3 X FRCs at Naval Base Guam to include Lessons Learned from maturing CG-7/OPNAV N51 MOA.

– Fiscal Year 2015: Process Organization Change Request to homeport 3 X Medium Endurance Cutters at Naval Station Pensacola.

– Continue to develop solutions to permanently station aviation assets at Naval Base Ventura County.

– Support feasibility studies to identify potential homeport locations for West Coast Offshore Patrol Cutters

I am planning on two follow-up posts, one about what they had to say about the OPC and one about the implications of homeporting Coast Guard ships at Navy Bases.

TABLE OF CONTENTS
Section Page No.

1.  Preamble …………………………………………………. 9
2.  Purpose ………………………………………………….. 9
3.  National Fleet Plan Overview ……………………………….. 9
4.  Plan Progression and Oversight……………………………………………………… 10
5.  National Fleet Plan…………………………………………..………………………… 10
5.1.  Current and Evolving Operations……………………………10
5.2.  Integrated Logistics………………………………………….……………..……….. 12
5.3.  Training……………………………………………………………..………………… 15
5.4.  Maritime Security Cooperation…………………….……………………..………… 21
5.5.  Command, Control, Communications (C3) Systems……………….….………… 22
5.6.  Sensors………………………………………………………………………………… 25
5.7.  Weapon Systems…………………………………………………….……….……… 26
5.8.  Engineering Systems……………………………………………………….………… 28
5.9.  Platforms………………………………………………………………….…………… 29
5.10. Intelligence and Information Integration …………………. 34
6.  Programmatic Collaboration…………………………………………………………… 36
7.  Integrated Plan of Action and Milestones…………………………………..…….….. 36
8.  Navy-Coast Guard Memoranda of Understanding/Memoranda of Agreement…… 44
9.  Legal Authorities ……………………………………………….………………… 48
Chartered Commonality Working Groups:  Mission/Plan of Action and Milestones
Appendix A.  Permanent Joint Working Group…………………………………………… 50
Appendix B.  Small Boat Commonality Integrated Process Team …….. 51
Appendix C.  Naval Logistics Integration………………………………………………..… 52
Appendix D.  SSBN Transit Protection Systems…………………………………………. 53
Appendix E.  Strategic Laydown Working Group………………………………………… 54
Appendix F.  Arctic Working Group ……………………………….55
Appendix G.  Maritime Security Cooperation Council ………………… 56
Glossary……………………………………………………………………………………… 57

12 thoughts on “National Fleet Plan

  1. about the implications of homeporting Coast Guard ships at Navy Bases.

    The Coast Guard already does this I think – they have an 87 Blue Shark that normally ties up at the Everett Navy Base here in Puget Sound – since they normally tie up there between patrols I am assuming they are home ported there. Sorry don’t know how the support structure works, the Coast Guard also has at least one Buoy Tender that also operates out of the same base and what looks like some shore support building for working on the ATON’s – maybe they lease space from the Navy or something

    They also have another 87 the Osprey that has in the past tied in a civilian marina at Port Townsend

    Maybe not apples and apples to what you are referring to – and yes an 87 is not the same as the larger Cutters

    • I think the 87ft is there to protect the boomers as they go into and out of port. I think it was bought by the Navy for the USCG for that job.

      • The Coast Guard also uses their small boats at least part of the time for boomer escort also – had some friends boarded when a boomer went by – said they were well out of the exclusion zone, thought the CG was just bored that afternoon.

  2. sharing facilities makes sense to me to save on much needed capital and space in peace time. But at the same time if arctic region gets hot you know the navy is going to be using the coast guard bases in the region also.

  3. The Coast Guard has two units with the specific mission of escorting SSBNs while transiting on the surface from their bases to deep water. The Navy bought four 87 footers for these units and they are armed with what looks like a smaller version of the Mk38 mod2, a remotely controlled .50 cal. on an elevated platform on the bow. I did a short post on these units earlier. https://chuckhillscgblog.net/2012/10/29/cg-maritime-force-protection-units/

  4. There are obvious advantages in using Navy bases as cutter homeports and we have been doing it, but I think there may be disadvantages too.

    Two of the West Coast 378s were based at Naval Station San Diego and there are several other examples too. I’ll talk about both advantages and disadvantages.

  5. Are you aware that NSC hulls on NSC#1 and #2 have cracked and are scheduled for dry docking for repairs. They cannot operate in rough seas or in cold water. The unmanned vehicle that was intended to extend the area of coverage has never worked and the system of recovering small boats from the rear has failed another test just recently.

  6. Pingback: Equipment for the Offshore Patrol Cutter | Chuck Hill's CG Blog

  7. Pingback: Ruminating on Homeports While Playing the Red Cell | Chuck Hill's CG Blog

  8. Pingback: Ruminating on Homeports While Playing the Red Cell | News

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