2018 Aviation Order of Battle–USNI

Would like to point to a nice summary of aviation assets that is available on line from the US Naval Institute (USNI, unfortunately behind the pay wall–see late addition below). It is the work of a friend, Jim Dolbow, who many years ago encouraged me to blog. He now works for the USNI and is responsible for the two latest editions of the Coast Guardsman’s Manual.

Included are aircraft of the Marine Corps, Navy, Coast Guard, U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) Air and Marine Operations, and NOAA as of 31 July, 2018

Navy and Marine units list aircraft type, squadron, and base but don’t actually list numbers of aircraft.

Coast Guard aircraft numbers, by type, are listed below, but the article goes on to identify number and type at each CG air station. It also notes there are 160 civilian CG Aux. aircraft.

Coast Guard aviation as of 31 July 2018 consisted of 7 different types of aircraft representing 207 airframes based at 27 different locations, including:

(17)     HC-130H Hercules

(9)       HC-130J Super Hercules long range surveillance aircraft

(18)     HC-144 Ocean Sentry medium range surveillance aircraft

(14)     HC-27J Spartan medium range surveillance aircraft

(2)       C-37A Gulfstream V

(45)     MH-60T Jayhawk medium range recovery helicopter

(102)   MH-65D/E Dolphin short range recovery helicopter

I was a bit surprised to find the U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) Air and Marine Operations had more aircraft than the Coast Guard, 97 fixed wing and 128 helicopters (vs 60 fixed wing and 147 helos for the CG). Numbers of each type is provided but no information on basing.

NOAA has nine manned fixed wing aircraft, identified by number and type, all operated out of NOAA’s Aircraft Operations Center at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport, FL.


Late addition:

Just realized the USNI post is only available to USNI members (You really should be a member). Hopefully they will forgive me if I copy and paste a good chunk of the CG portion below.

Current Asset Laydown of USCG Aircraft:

USCG Air Station Cape Cod, MA

(3) HC-144A

(3) MH-60T

USCG Air Station Atlantic City, NJ

(11) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Washington, DC

(2) C-37A

USCG Air Station Elizabeth City, NC

(6) HC-130J

(3) MH-60T

(5) HC-27J

USCG Aviation Logistics Center, Elizabeth City, NC

Aircraft undergoing depot maintenance/support:

(4) HC-130H

(3) HC-130J

(3) HC-144

(2) HC-27J

(6) MH-60T

(10) MH-65D

(2) MH-65E

USCG Air Station Savannah, GA

(5) MH-65D

USCG Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron Jacksonville, FL

(10) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Miami, FL

(5) MH-65D

(5) HC-144A

USCG Air Station Clearwater, FL

(4) HC-130H

(10) MH-60T

USCG Air Station Borinquen, PR

(4) MH-65D

USCG Aviation Training Center Mobile, AL

(3) HC-144A

(4) MH-60T

(9) MH-65D/E

USCG Air Station New Orleans, LA

(5) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Houston, TX

(3) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Corpus Christi, TX

(3) HC-144A

(3) MH-65D

USCG Air Station San Diego, CA

(3) MH-60T

USCG Air Station San Francisco, CA

(7) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Humboldt Bay, CA

(3) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Sacramento, CA

(6) HC-27J

USCG Air Station North Bend, OR

(5) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Astoria, OR

(3) MH-60T

USCG Air Station Port Angeles, WA

(3) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Detroit, MI

(5) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Traverse City, MI

(3) MH-60T

USCG Air Station Sitka, AK

(3) MH-60T

USCG Air Station Kodiak, AK

(5) HC-130H

(6) MH-60T

(4) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Barbers Point, HI

(4) HC-130H

(3) MH-65D


15 thoughts on “2018 Aviation Order of Battle–USNI

  1. Doesn’t the USCG also share the use of Two “Aerostat” Balloons with the USB&CP Services and also have access to ~8 Lockheed P-3B AEW&C which also does Drug Interdiction missions…

  2. The Coast Guard flew CBP aircraft on the Texas Border in the late 1940s. They were assigned for ATF and Immigration patrols.

    Strange the Coast Guard uses “Order of Battle” when Coast Guard Aviation has no military mission.

  3. I seem to remember all of our helicopters have been modified to permit “Airborne Use of Force,” but always seems that only the helos from Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron Jacksonville (HITRON) seem to be on ships that go to the Eastern Pacific.

    Are any of the other air stations actually prepared to employ Airborne Use of Force?

  4. Pingback: “In Budget Squeeze, Coast Guard Set to Extend Life of Dolphin Helicopter Fleet”–USNI | Chuck Hill's CG Blog

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s