2018 Aviation Order of Battle–USNI

Would like to point to a nice summary of aviation assets that is available on line from the US Naval Institute (USNI, unfortunately behind the pay wall–see late addition below). It is the work of a friend, Jim Dolbow, who many years ago encouraged me to blog. He now works for the USNI and is responsible for the two latest editions of the Coast Guardsman’s Manual.

Included are aircraft of the Marine Corps, Navy, Coast Guard, U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) Air and Marine Operations, and NOAA as of 31 July, 2018

Navy and Marine units list aircraft type, squadron, and base but don’t actually list numbers of aircraft.

Coast Guard aircraft numbers, by type, are listed below, but the article goes on to identify number and type at each CG air station. It also notes there are 160 civilian CG Aux. aircraft.

Coast Guard aviation as of 31 July 2018 consisted of 7 different types of aircraft representing 207 airframes based at 27 different locations, including:

(17)     HC-130H Hercules

(9)       HC-130J Super Hercules long range surveillance aircraft

(18)     HC-144 Ocean Sentry medium range surveillance aircraft

(14)     HC-27J Spartan medium range surveillance aircraft

(2)       C-37A Gulfstream V

(45)     MH-60T Jayhawk medium range recovery helicopter

(102)   MH-65D/E Dolphin short range recovery helicopter

I was a bit surprised to find the U.S. Customs and Border Protection’s (CBP) Air and Marine Operations had more aircraft than the Coast Guard, 97 fixed wing and 128 helicopters (vs 60 fixed wing and 147 helos for the CG). Numbers of each type is provided but no information on basing.

NOAA has nine manned fixed wing aircraft, identified by number and type, all operated out of NOAA’s Aircraft Operations Center at Lakeland Linder Regional Airport, FL.


Late addition:

Just realized the USNI post is only available to USNI members (You really should be a member). Hopefully they will forgive me if I copy and paste a good chunk of the CG portion below.

Current Asset Laydown of USCG Aircraft:

USCG Air Station Cape Cod, MA

(3) HC-144A

(3) MH-60T

USCG Air Station Atlantic City, NJ

(11) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Washington, DC

(2) C-37A

USCG Air Station Elizabeth City, NC

(6) HC-130J

(3) MH-60T

(5) HC-27J

USCG Aviation Logistics Center, Elizabeth City, NC

Aircraft undergoing depot maintenance/support:

(4) HC-130H

(3) HC-130J

(3) HC-144

(2) HC-27J

(6) MH-60T

(10) MH-65D

(2) MH-65E

USCG Air Station Savannah, GA

(5) MH-65D

USCG Helicopter Interdiction Tactical Squadron Jacksonville, FL

(10) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Miami, FL

(5) MH-65D

(5) HC-144A

USCG Air Station Clearwater, FL

(4) HC-130H

(10) MH-60T

USCG Air Station Borinquen, PR

(4) MH-65D

USCG Aviation Training Center Mobile, AL

(3) HC-144A

(4) MH-60T

(9) MH-65D/E

USCG Air Station New Orleans, LA

(5) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Houston, TX

(3) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Corpus Christi, TX

(3) HC-144A

(3) MH-65D

USCG Air Station San Diego, CA

(3) MH-60T

USCG Air Station San Francisco, CA

(7) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Humboldt Bay, CA

(3) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Sacramento, CA

(6) HC-27J

USCG Air Station North Bend, OR

(5) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Astoria, OR

(3) MH-60T

USCG Air Station Port Angeles, WA

(3) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Detroit, MI

(5) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Traverse City, MI

(3) MH-60T

USCG Air Station Sitka, AK

(3) MH-60T

USCG Air Station Kodiak, AK

(5) HC-130H

(6) MH-60T

(4) MH-65D

USCG Air Station Barbers Point, HI

(4) HC-130H

(3) MH-65D


Semi-Submersible Intercepted Near Texas? Don’t Think So

Quoting one of the articles below, “© U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Military intercepted a self-propelled semi-submersible vessel loaded with more than 3,800 pounds of cocaine right outside U.S. borders.” 

I have seen a couple of articles lately that claim a self propelled semi-submersible was seized off Texas.

The first was, “Self-Propelled vessel intercepted smuggling more than 3,800 pounds of cocaine near Texas”

A U.S. Coast Guard cutter intercepted a self-propelled semi-submersible vessel engaged in smuggling more than 3,800 pounds of cocaine, federal officials said Sunday.

According to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), on November 13, CBP and Marine Operations (AMO) arrested the crew during operations in international waters (I don’t think this could be true–Chuck), and all three suspects will face charges in the U.S.

“The drug cartels are relentless and extremely innovative,” National Air Security Operations Center – Corpus Christi Director Allen Durham said.

“Interdicting self-propelled semi-submersible vessels requires expertise and the right aircraft. Air and Marine Operations will continue to beat the cartels at their own game to protect our borders.”

The multi-day operation from surveillance to interception, according to CBP, involved several interagency partners including the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy.

AMO operates maritime patrol aircraft from Corpus Christi, Texas, and Jacksonville, Florida, to conduct long-range aerial patrols and surveillance missions along the U.S. borders and in drug transit zones in Central and South America, according to CBP.

The second was, “Narco subs: Texas mobilises to stem invasion of narcotic carrying submarines.”

“”The drug cartels are relentless and extremely innovative,” the Corpus Christi director for the National Air Security Operations Center said earlier this month. “Interdicting self-propelled semi-submersible vessels requires expertise and the right aircraft.”

“Texas is mobilising its drug agents and prosecutors to specifically target drug submarine builders and operators, ABC America reports.”

These both appear to stem from a press release that originated in Texas from Customs and Border Protection, presumably the National Air Security Operations Center – Corpus Christi Director Allen DurhamApparently the semi-submersible was detected by a CBP P-3.

As far as I can tell, the interdiction, which apparently occurred on November 13, actually happened off Panama.

If and when we ever get self propelled semi-submersibles going directly into the US, it will be a significant event with its possible implications for terrorism, but I don’t think we have any public knowledge of that happening yet.