CBP Intercepts Canadian Fishing Boats in Disputed Waters

We have a Canadian report (actually more than one) that Customs and Border Protection marine units are intercepting, boarding, and questioning Canadian fishermen in a disputed area in the vicinity of Machias Seal Islandabout 19 kilometres southwest of Grand Manan Island and east of Maine.

In the past two weeks, at least 10 Canadian fishing boats from New Brunswick have been intercepted by U.S. Border Patrol agents while fishing in the disputed waters around Machias Seal Island, a spokesman for the fishermen says.

According to the report, “They’re in international waters, so border patrol shouldn’t be boarding Canadian vessels.”

Additionally it is reported the agents were asking questions about illegal immigrants. You have to appreciate the Canadians’ sense of humor.

The suggestion that the border agents were looking for illegal immigrants seems improbable, he said.

“That’s possible, but … the Gulf of Maine is not a major route for illegal immigrants sneaking into the United States,” Kelly said. “If anything, people are sneaking the other way. They’re trying to get out of the U.S. and into Canada to claim asylum.”

There is an angrier sounding report here.

 

Semi-Submersible Intercepted Near Texas? Don’t Think So

Quoting one of the articles below, “© U.S. Customs and Border Protection, Military intercepted a self-propelled semi-submersible vessel loaded with more than 3,800 pounds of cocaine right outside U.S. borders.” 

I have seen a couple of articles lately that claim a self propelled semi-submersible was seized off Texas.

The first was, “Self-Propelled vessel intercepted smuggling more than 3,800 pounds of cocaine near Texas”

A U.S. Coast Guard cutter intercepted a self-propelled semi-submersible vessel engaged in smuggling more than 3,800 pounds of cocaine, federal officials said Sunday.

According to the U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP), on November 13, CBP and Marine Operations (AMO) arrested the crew during operations in international waters (I don’t think this could be true–Chuck), and all three suspects will face charges in the U.S.

“The drug cartels are relentless and extremely innovative,” National Air Security Operations Center – Corpus Christi Director Allen Durham said.

“Interdicting self-propelled semi-submersible vessels requires expertise and the right aircraft. Air and Marine Operations will continue to beat the cartels at their own game to protect our borders.”

The multi-day operation from surveillance to interception, according to CBP, involved several interagency partners including the U.S. Coast Guard and the U.S. Navy.

AMO operates maritime patrol aircraft from Corpus Christi, Texas, and Jacksonville, Florida, to conduct long-range aerial patrols and surveillance missions along the U.S. borders and in drug transit zones in Central and South America, according to CBP.

The second was, “Narco subs: Texas mobilises to stem invasion of narcotic carrying submarines.”

“”The drug cartels are relentless and extremely innovative,” the Corpus Christi director for the National Air Security Operations Center said earlier this month. “Interdicting self-propelled semi-submersible vessels requires expertise and the right aircraft.”

“Texas is mobilising its drug agents and prosecutors to specifically target drug submarine builders and operators, ABC America reports.”

These both appear to stem from a press release that originated in Texas from Customs and Border Protection, presumably the National Air Security Operations Center – Corpus Christi Director Allen DurhamApparently the semi-submersible was detected by a CBP P-3.

As far as I can tell, the interdiction, which apparently occurred on November 13, actually happened off Panama.

If and when we ever get self propelled semi-submersibles going directly into the US, it will be a significant event with its possible implications for terrorism, but I don’t think we have any public knowledge of that happening yet.