USCGC Eagle arrives in Iceland, hosts U.S.-Iceland meeting

Below is a LANTAREA news release. Eagle is in Iceland, but looks like more than a simple portcall.

The vessel seen in the third photo, background, right, is, I believe, the Icelandic Coast Guard cutter ICGV Þór (Thor).

Maybe while there, someone could take a look at this innovative hull form for motor surf boats and RHIBs.

united states coast guard
News Release
U.S. Coast Guard Atlantic Area

USCGC Eagle arrives in Iceland, hosts U.S.-Iceland meeting

USCGC Eagle arriving Iceland
USCGC Eagle wreath-laying for USCGC Hamilton
USCGC Eagle arriving Iceland
VADM Poulin meets with Dept. of State, Iceland leaders
Vice Adm. Steven Poulin, commander U.S. Coast Guard Atlantic Area, shakes hands with Chargé d'Affaires Harry Kamian
Eagle hosts Iceland leaders, CO gives tour

Editors’ Note: To view more or download high-resolution imagery, click on the photos above.

REYKJAVIK, Iceland — USCGC Eagle (WIX 327), “America’s Tall Ship,” arrived in Reykjavik Wednesday and proceeded to host tours and senior officials through the weekend.


Aboard Eagle moored in the harbor, Vice Adm. Steven Poulin, commander U.S. Coast Guard Atlantic Area, joined by Jonathan Moore, principal deputy assistant secretary, Bureau of Oceans and International Environmental and Scientific Affairs, met with Commadore Asgrimur Asgrimsson of the Icelandic coast guard, Chargé d’Affaires Harry Kamian, and Byrndis Kjartansdottir, director of security and defense directorate in the Icelandic Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

“I congratulate Iceland on a successful Arctic Council and Arctic Coast Guard Forum chairmanship, and I thank them for their persistent and reliable partnership in the Arctic Council and Arctic Coast Guard Forum. Maintaining a strong, rules-based order in the Arctic remains a top priority, both for my command and the U.S. Coast Guard. Steadfast partners like Iceland enable and enforce this,” said Vice Adm. Steven Poulin. “It was a great pleasure to discuss the challenges we share with such dedicated colleagues learning more about our partner agencies and their operations.” 

The United States was the first country to recognize Iceland’s independence in 1944. In addition to being founding members of NATO, the United States and Iceland signed a bilateral defense agreement in 1951. Cooperation and mutual support are the foundation of the U.S.-Icelandic relationship. Visits such as Eagle’s allow opportunities to further effective partnerships, collaboration, and interoperability for various issues that can occur in the Arctic.   

For more than a century, the U.S. Coast Guard has been the visible U.S. surface presence in the Arctic, ensuring adherence to the rules-based order. We work with High North nations to safeguard and enable the uninterrupted flow of maritime commerce throughout the entire Marine Transportation System, including the burgeoning Arctic and ensure responsible stewardship of its resources. Allies and partners like Iceland are integral to protecting the United States’ enduring interests, preserving our mutual interests, and upholding the rules-based international order supporting good maritime governance.  

On approach to Iceland, Eagle’s crew conducted a wreath-laying in memory of the Treasury-class USCGC Hamilton (WPG 34), torpedoed by German submarine U-132 on January 30, 1942, patrolling the Icelandic coast near Reykjavík. Hamilton capsized and sank 28 miles (45 km) from the Icelandic coast on January 30, at the cost of 26 of the ship’s 221-person crew. In 2009, divers discovered the wreck in over 300 feet of water, and in 2013, a memorial plaque was placed in honor of those lost.  

Eagle is currently conducting summer U.S. Coast Guard Academy cadet training in at-sea leadership and professional development. Their first port call was Portugal in late May. Eagle has served as a classroom at sea to future Coast Guard officers since 1946, offering an at-sea leadership and professional development experience as part of the Coast Guard Academy curriculum.  


Eagle is a three-masted barque with more than 6,797 square meters (22,300 square feet) of sail and 9.7 kilometers (6 miles) of rigging. At 90 meters (295 feet) in length, Eagle is the largest tall ship flying the stars and stripes and the only active square-rigger in United States government service. For information about Eagle, including port cities, tour schedules, current events, as well as cadet and active duty crewmember photographs, follow the “United States Coast Guard Barque EAGLE” Facebook page or on Instagram @barqueeagle. All U.S. Coast Guard imagery is in the public domain and is encouraged to be shared widely.  

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