Two More WHECs, if You Please–Philippines?

File:PF-15 and SARV-002 CARAT 2013.jpg

Photo Credit: United States Navy with the ID 130629-N-YU572-530, by Mass Communication Specialist 1st Class Jay C. Pugh, PHILIPPINE SEA (June 29, 2013) The Philippine Coast Guard vessel Edsa (SARV 002), left, and the Philippine Navy frigate Gregorio Del Pilar (PF 15) steam in formation during Cooperation Afloat Readiness and Training (CARAT) Philippines 2013.

Global Post is reporting the Philippines is looking for two more “frigates” from the U. S. It is not clear they are referring to Hamilton Class Cutters, but it seems likely. Referring to the two WHECs they already have, the article states,

“The Philippines has already acquired two refurbished American frigates in the past two years, and they now lead patrols in the South China Sea.”

The request might conceivably refer to retiring Perry Class navy frigates, but that would introduce an additional set of systems to the Philippine Navy and the gas turbine powered FFG-7s are not as economical to operate as the normally diesel powered Hamiltons with their combined diesel or gas turbine (CODOG) power plant. The redundancy offered by the cutters’ four engine, two shaft power plant may also be seen as an advantage over the FFG-7’s two engine, single shaft propulsion.

13 thoughts on “Two More WHECs, if You Please–Philippines?

  1. June 11 — Appropriations Committee Approves Fiscal Year 2015 Homeland Security Bill :
    http://appropriations.house.gov/news/documentsingle.aspx?DocumentID=384154
    Follow the link on the Bills Report. (last line of the article)

    //
    Page 73 of that PDF.
    The Committee provides full funding for the military pay raise included in the fiscal year 2015 request, and recommends the following increases above the budget request: $15,047,000 to restore operations hours, a five percent increase above the request; $4,200,000 for counterdrug surge operations; $14,904,000 to prevent the proposed decommissioning of two High Endurance Cutters, restoring over 6,600 annualized cutter hours in source and
    transit zones;
    //

    Although the bill is not yet approved, the recommendation powerful HASC carries weight

  2. The former 378s are now the Philippines foremost ships. this from the German Navy blog Marine Forum.
    22 June, PHILIPPINES – USA, „CARAT 2015“: US Navy, Marine Corps and the Armed Forces of the Philippines have begun the Philippine phase of this year’s cooperation afloat readiness and training (CARAT) exercise series in Puerto Princesa (Philippines) … in waters and airspace of the Sulu Sea, conduct combined operations at sea, mobile dive and salvage training, coastal riverine operations, as well as maritime patrol and reconnaissance … Philippine Navy to participate with HAMILTON class patrol frigates RAMON ALCARAZ and GRIGORIO DEL PILAR as well as PEACOCK class offshore patrol vessel APOLINARIO MABINI … US Navy deployed littoral combat ship FORT WORTH, salvage ship SAFEGUARD, P-3 Orion aircraft.
    (rmks: annual routine event; coinciding with CARAT – but separate from it – the Philippine Navy is also conducting an exercise with the Japanese Navy in Philippine waters)

    • CGC Boutwell finally decommissioned yesterday (16-Mar) and would be prepared for transfer to the Philippine Navy.

      Questions 🙂 — I observed that all the last six 378s, (including Boutwell and those still in service) — have a starboard C-frame davits, instead of the having both single-folding-arm slewing davit & crane (on the previous six).
      Any particular advantage/disadvantage on this setup? Any historical or anecdotes? C-frame looks more robust in terms of handling the RHIB during higher sea states, especially when assigned to do ALPAT.

    • I know it was in Alameda recently, being worked on. But I have no idea. I would think that they would be ready to sail about four months after the Philippine crew came to the US

      • The USCG is very much interoperable with the the USN, so at least from an equipment point of view the Philippine Navy should be too.

        That however does not address the question of training, doctrine, communications, and all the other “software” that is necessary for interoperability.

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