CG-83527

No caption.  No date listed; probably June 1944.  No photo number.  Photographer unknown.

No caption.
No date listed; probably June 1944.
No photo number.
Photographer unknown.

One of the proudest achievements in Coast Guard history was the performance of the sixty 83 foot gasoline powered, wooden hull patrol boats of Rescue Flotilla One, that saved 1,438 American and Allied lives during the Normandy landings in June 1944. An average of approximately 24 rescued for each boat.

"Crew of CG-16 pointing to the tally board of 126 rescued soldiers."  Photo courtesy of Terry Hannigan. (NOT AN OFFICIAL USCG PHOTOGRAPH)

“Crew of CG-16 pointing to the tally board of 126 rescued soldiers.”
Photo courtesy of Terry Hannigan.
(NOT AN OFFICIAL USCG PHOTOGRAPH)

There is at least one vessel of this class, CG83527, still in near original condition.

She’s in Everett, WA. Unfortunately the boat is not currently open to the public. The caretaker organization is having a hard time keeping the boat up. They need some help. Dan Withers, Cell: 206-947-2303, danwithers@q.com, is heading the organization.

At some point, I hope we will have this vessel, or another of its class, at the new Coast Guard museum being built at New London.

The 83-foot Coast Guard cutter USCG 1 off Omaha Beach on the morning of D-Day, tied up to an LCT and the Samuel Chase

The 83-foot Coast Guard cutter USCG 1 off Omaha Beach on the morning of D-Day, tied up to an LCT and the Samuel Chase

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s