76th Anniversary of the Death of Douglas Munro

By U.S. Coast Guard (Command) [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Today marks the 76th anniversary of SM1 Douglas Munro’s death while evacuating Marines from an ambush on Guadalcanal. Among the approximately 250 Marines rescued that day was Lewis Burwell “Chesty” Puller (June 26, 1898 – October 11, 1971), who having survived, became the most decorated Marine in US history.

Currently we are in the unusual position of having two ships named for this one man. WHEC-724, now renamed USCGC Douglas Munro commissioned on this day 47 years ago, and WMSL-755, USCGC Munro, a National Security Cutter commissioned in April 2017.

Lighthouse Act – 7 August 1789

Passing this along from Bryant’s Maritime Blog

clip_image008 The Lighthouse Act was the ninth statute adopted by the First Congress of the United States. It provided for the voluntary cession by the various states of all lighthouses, beacons, buoys, and public piers to the federal government and tasked the Secretary of the Treasury with building and maintaining the aids to maritime navigation. The Lighthouse Establishment (later named the United States Light House Service) is the oldest of the various components of the present-day United States Coast Guard, joining in 1939.

Cleveland Metroparks unveils historic Coast Guard renovation (photos)

Historic former CG station on the mouth of the Cuyahoga River, at the end of a 1,000-foot pier.Photo: John Petkovic, The Plain Dealer

Cleveland.com has a story about efforts to turn the former Coast Guard Station Cleveland, abandoned in 1976, into an attraction.

Lots of photos of how it was (like the one above) and how it is now, cleaned up, but with much work still to be done.

Photo: John Petkovic, The Plain Dealer

“Aircraft Used in Coast Guard Aviation”–Coast Guard Aviation Association

Douglas RD “Dolphin” (1932)

Just wanted to mention a link I recently added to the “References” page. “Aircraft Used in Coast Guard Aviation” has photos and links to information about what appears to all the aircraft the Coast Guard has used throughout its history. This is a project of the Coast Guard Aviation Association.

They also have a chronological history, accounts of notable SAR cases, and a section called “In their own words” that includes historical narratives, hangar tales, and oral histories.

The Coast Guard’s Great War Challenge–USNI Naval History Magazine

Miami-class cutter USCGC Tampa photographed in harbour, prior to the First World War. Completed in 1912 as the U.S. Revenue Cutter Miami, this ship was renamed Tampa in February 1916. On 26 September 1918, while operating in the English Channel, she was torpedoed and sunk by the German Submarine UB-91. All 131 persons on board Tampa were lost with her, the largest loss of life on any U.S. combat vessel during the First World War. Official U.S. Navy photo NH 1226 from the U.S. Navy Naval History and Heritage Command

The latest issue of the US Naval Institute’s Naval History Magazine has a nice summary of the Coast Guard’s First World War experience, written by Coast Guard Atlantic Area’s historian Dr. William H. Thiesen. It is available to anyone on line here. 

USCGC Seneca. US Goast Guard photo.

19th Century SAR on the Outer Banks

A friend, Lee W., sent me some information on Pea Island and the Life Saving Service on the Outer Banks of North Carolina. More travel log than an organized post, but hope you find it interesting, as I did. 

Oregon Inlet.  The surge under the old bridge and through the inlet was wicked!

They tore the old high bridge down and built a combination causeway and bridge on the sound side. See below.  The Station house that used to be on the spit of land to right. Now it has been restored at the Pea Island Wildlife Refuge.

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Here is more about the Pea Island Life Saving Station & crew

In 1880 Captain Richard Etheridge, a former slave and Civil War veteran, was appointed as keeper of the Pea Island Lifesaving Station, 30 miles north of Cape Hatteras.

http://afscmecouncil8.org/richard-etheridge-and-the-pea-island-lifesavers/

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Book: Fire on the Beach – Richard Etheridge “A Man among the Men”

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Benjamin Bowser, Jr., who served with the United States Life-Saving Service at the Pea Island Life-Saving Station from 1884 until his death in 1900 honored in a ceremony

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USCG photo. World War I Pea Island surfman

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Pea Island LSS cook house reconstructed in Manteo

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Map of the US LSS stations

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Map by Mark Anderson Moore, courtesy North Carolina Office of Archives and History, Raleigh

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Sumner I. Kimball, Superintendent of the US Life-Saving Service 1871-1915.

The Midgett and Etheridge families are still on the Outer Banks

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USCGC Richard Ehteridge  WPC-1102