Russian Navy Primer–USNI

If you are interested in being up to speed on the Russian Navy, the US Naval Institute has provided access to an Office of Naval Intelligence (ONI) briefing book on the Russian Navy.

“Cdr Salamander” provides an intro to the publication on the US Naval Institute Blog. 

Unfortunately I did not see anything about the Russian Coast Guard in my initial scan of the document. It is a not insignificant force.

On page 5, where you see the 1000 mile rings that the document suggest the Russians have a special interest in, you might notice that one includes most of Alaska.

It is a nice, readable update.

 

5 thoughts on “Russian Navy Primer–USNI

  1. I like to see this version of Russia’s ship count. The Russian Navy web site isn’t accurate and I see some other versions from sources out there that reflect a much higher ship count.

  2. The Russian Coast Guard would add six frigates and twelve corvettes, but then the USN never counts the USCG ships either.

    Then again, the USCG ships are not armed like the Russian CG.

      • I think it is politics. The USN surface types in particular do not want CG ships seen as a budget alternative to Navy ships.

        On the other hand the Navy has its own internal struggles between the Surface, Air and Sub communities. It might be possible to exploit those. The DOD’s recent cuts in the LCS/frigate program, redirecting money to the air side, is a victory of the Air community over the surface community.

        Pointing to more CG cutters as an alternative to Navy ships might be seen as a way to satisfy Congress and send Navy money to the air or sub side.

        But so far, in spite of the “National Fleet” talk, when the gross numbers of the US Fleet is discussed, it never includes USCG although the Navy tried to include Hospital ships and Cyclone class PCs, a move Congress blocked.

        I think it is worthwhile attempting to get cutters included in the list, at least cruising cutters over 1,000 tons, and icebreakers. Buoy tenders maybe not although the Navy includes unarmed support vessels.

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