Norway’s Coast Guard Jan Mayen-class vessel

Norway’s Coast Guard Jan Mayen-class vessel (Picture source: Vard)

We have some new information on Norway’s three new very large ice capable Arctic patrol ships. Naval News reports they will be equipped with inertial navigation systems and we have the artist’s concept above I had not seen previously.

“We’re very proud to be supporting the Norwegian Coast Guard in securing Norway’s exclusive economic zone (EEZ), internal and territorial waters.”, states Regis Blomme, Sales Director at iXblue. “The arctic zone, in which the new vessels will operate, is a very challenging environment and our Fiber-Optic Gyroscope (FOG) based INS and Netans NDDCS have already proven to offer highly accurate, resilient, and secure navigation in such Northern latitudes. We particularly want to thank Vard for their strong vote of confidence in our technology and look forward to our collaboration with them.”

As we noted earlier,

“Deliveries of the three vessels are scheduled from Vard Langsten in Norway in 1Q 2022, 1Q 2023 and 1Q 2024 respectively. The hulls will be built at Vard’s Tulcea, Romania, shipyard…”

Specifications are:

  • Displacement: 9,800 tons
  • Length: 136.4 meters (447.4 ft) loa
  • Beam: 22 meters (72.16 ft)
  • Draft: 6.2 meter (20.3 ft)
  • Speed: 22 knots.

Note–VARD is also the designer for the Offshore Patrol Cutters.

8 thoughts on “Norway’s Coast Guard Jan Mayen-class vessel

  1. I understand that those ships arent icebreakers with that bow shape, it make more sense for artic patrol ships something like the Canadian Harry DeWolf class (but more armed) or the Russian Project 23550 patrol ship.

    • Until the current NANSEN class frigates entered into service, the Coast’s Guard NORDKAPP class vessels (I am thinking these are the ones the new ships are replacing) were larger than the RNN ships and also (if you looked at their planned wartime armament, FFBN) possibly more capable.
      With that being said, the NANSEN class is a very capable class (just keep them off the rocks) and while maybe smaller, probably more military capable than anything the Norwegian Coast Guard is planning on fielding.
      I *suspect* (but do not know) that the size of the new cutters is too allow long endurance, margins for growth, and help in ice situations, etc.. From what I have been told, the steel and internal volume of a ship is relatively cheap to build, it is the systems and people that are expensive.
      Just my $0.02 worth.

  2. Interesting that they mention inertial navigation systems. Someone is planning for GPS to be turned off when the balloon goes up. Also GEOS satellite systems work poorly in the high latitudes to start with.

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