“LCI(L) 85: The Four- Leaf Clover”

LCI(L) 85 shortly before she sank, D-Day, 6 June 1944.

Earlier today, I passed along a story about one Coast Guardsman’s experience on D-Day on my CG Blog Facebook page.

Got a response from a reader who linked a longer tale of the Coastie’s ship, LCI(L) 85: The Four- Leaf Clover. This is the story of a very small ship, about the same size as a Webber class WPC, one that did not even rate a name, in a very big war. Several crewmembers were discussed including what happened to them after D-Day and after the war. Its a great story.

I’ve added both stories to my heritage page. There are several other D-Day stories there as well.

Thanks to Tom Wade for bringing this to my attention.

5 thoughts on ““LCI(L) 85: The Four- Leaf Clover”

  1. As I recall, the LCS(L)(3)102 “Mighty Midget” was based on the same hull design and sported a single bow mounted 3″/50 gun and ten Mk.7 4.5″ rocket launchers…

    • @Secundius, from the Wikipedia, linked above as “very small ship”,

      “The Landing Craft Support (Large) or “LCS(L) Mark 3″ was built by the United States. These ships were built on a standard LCI hull, but were modified to add gunfire support equipment and accommodation. They were armed with a single 3″/50 caliber gun and/or two twin 40 mm cannon and numerous 20 mm cannon. These ships were prevalent in most major Pacific Theater invasions beginning in late 1944. The type was reclassified as Landing Ship Support, Large (LSSL) in 1949. One hundred and thirty of this type were built.”

      • They were also used at Normandy to get within near point blank range for their 3″/50 to be used effectively as can openers against German fortifications…

      • There were several different designs. The first two were British adaptions used in the ETO. Mark 3 were US designs used in the Pacfici

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