“5 facts you may not know about the Coast Guard at Normandy” –Coast Guard Compass

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Normandy Invasion, June 1944 A convoy of Landing Craft Infantry (Large) sails across the English Channel toward the Normandy Invasion beaches on “D-Day”, 6 June 1944. Each of these landing craft is towing a barrage balloon for protection against low-flying German aircraft. Photograph from the U.S. Coast Guard Collection in the U.S. National Archives. Photo #: 26-G-2333

On this the 75th anniversary of the Normandy landings, Coast Guard Compass offers  “5 facts you may not know about the Coast Guard at Normandy.”

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“SHE FELT THE NAZIS’ WRATH:” A U.S. Coast Guard infantry landing craft still flies its flag, though knocked out of the invasion, ripped and wounded on the beaches of France. Moving in for a landing, the LCI ran afoul of an underwater obstruction, which tore a gaping hole in her bow. Then as its cargo of troops piled ashore, Nazi shells battered her out of further action.”; no date; Photo No. 2395; photographer unknown.

Coast Guard participation in the invasion included three Coast Guard manned attack transports, two more that were partially CG manned, eleven Landing Ship Tanks (LST), 24 Landing Craft Infantry, Large (LCI(L)), and 60 wooden hulled 83 foot patrol boats. In addition the Coast Guard manned numerous smaller landing craft.

Some previously published info:

Ready for Combat SAR?

USCG 83 ft patrol boat, probably June 1944. Photographer unknown.

The April issue of the US Naval Institute (USNI) Proceedings has an article that contends “Combat Rescue Needs a Renaissance.” The Coast Guard has had some experience with Combat SAR. It has been decades, but if we are ever in an extended conflict with one or more near peer nations, you can be sure we will be doing it again.
Not that this could ever be exclusively a Coast Guard mission, but perhaps we ought to aggressively acknowledge a role in this mission. Make sure we are equipped for it, and train for it. Perhaps occasionally deploy with an Amphibious Ready Group and exercise the role.
Long term we might ensure that the H-60 replacement can operate from our ships in this role.
The USNI article noted:
“…all our surface vessels need a combat survivor evader locater (CSEL) radio on the bridge, so there is no delay in reporting the need for rescue. Ideally, all surface vessel lifeboats should be equipped with a CSEL as well. Even without new combat rescue aircraft, we need to start training better with the ones we have and incorporate assets such as the LCS, ESB, and EPF into fleet combat rescue events.”
Perhaps we should consider this as well.